Posts tagged know your dcu

Know Your DCU: The New 52

I’m loving the responses and questions I’m getting to my article. I want to address some of them now if I can.

I started it in a very negative tone, but got to a positive place by writing it. A lot of you have negative opinions on the New 52, and that’s ok. A lot of you have positive opinions on the New 52, and that’s ok too. On the whole, I have not enjoyed the New 52. At all. I went from reading 2 or 3 DC books a week (2011) to just 2 or 3 a month (2014). Think about that? The guy who runs a DC Comics Tumblr hardly reading DC Comics.

And I want to! That’s the crazy part.

It seems simple right? Put out 2 or 3 quality books a week and take a risk on the rest. I’m all for risk! I love risk! Risk is how we get surprise hit books. But when you risk 52 issues a month, things can go very wrong.  

Like I said, I started that article with a very negative opinion and got to a positive place. I can’t help but think positively…

Know Your DCU: The New 52
When I started this site, I could tell you everything that was going on in the DCU and pretty much tell you everything that had happened since the first Crisis.
Now?
I feel so lost in the New 52. I have a pretty good handle on the Bat-Universe, even if I am still perplexed about what is and isn’t in continuity. Hell, I’m not 100% sure who the hell Tim Drake is. What drives him? Why did he put on the costume?
I think that’s why I’m so lost in the New 52. It’s not just Tim, but almost every character in the New 52, hero and villain alike, is driven by a past we don’t know or understand. When the New 52 first started, we were given a list of things that were still in continuity. Some of that list is no longer relevant…well… most of that list is no longer relevant.
The truth is, now-a-days, I don’t Know Your DCU. I wish I did. I feel like a fraud running this DCU Tumblr and not having a clue what is happening in the comic book pages of the DCU. 
The other truth I’ve come to realize is, I’m not alone.
DC is still forming the New 52 universe. Batman Zero Year is fantastic and is shining a light on who this Batman is. But besides Batman and Superman, I’m not sure where everyone else has come from. Slowly we are learning more and more about each character and their history (and even their futures). I wish DC started the New 52 for every character in their own personal Zero Year so we could learn everyone’s history at once. But we are still learning more and more about our favorite characters every month…
So what’s next for the New 52? No one knows, and that’s pretty damn exciting.

Know Your DCU: The New 52

When I started this site, I could tell you everything that was going on in the DCU and pretty much tell you everything that had happened since the first Crisis.

Now?

I feel so lost in the New 52. I have a pretty good handle on the Bat-Universe, even if I am still perplexed about what is and isn’t in continuity. Hell, I’m not 100% sure who the hell Tim Drake is. What drives him? Why did he put on the costume?

I think that’s why I’m so lost in the New 52. It’s not just Tim, but almost every character in the New 52, hero and villain alike, is driven by a past we don’t know or understand. When the New 52 first started, we were given a list of things that were still in continuity. Some of that list is no longer relevant…well… most of that list is no longer relevant.

The truth is, now-a-days, I don’t Know Your DCU. I wish I did. I feel like a fraud running this DCU Tumblr and not having a clue what is happening in the comic book pages of the DCU.

The other truth I’ve come to realize is, I’m not alone.

DC is still forming the New 52 universe. Batman Zero Year is fantastic and is shining a light on who this Batman is. But besides Batman and Superman, I’m not sure where everyone else has come from. Slowly we are learning more and more about each character and their history (and even their futures). I wish DC started the New 52 for every character in their own personal Zero Year so we could learn everyone’s history at once. But we are still learning more and more about our favorite characters every month…

So what’s next for the New 52? No one knows, and that’s pretty damn exciting.




Know Your DCU: Aquaman
Oh Aquaman. Has there ever been a superhero as popular and more misunderstood? When done in animation, he’s always been treated with respect. It’s why I went with the above images. An incredible character, who has always had some of the best books arriving every month… whether you like him classic, hook handed, or bearded.
Comics History: Created by Paul Norris and Mort Weisinger, Aquaman first appeared in More Fun Comics #73 in November 1941. He would go on the found the justice league (pre-crisis, post crisis, Detroit, and New 52). Post Crisis, the character grew a beard and lost a hand… he got better.
Pop Culture History: Superfriends, Justice League, and Batman: The Brave and the Bold (which is a fan favorite).
Character History: As a baby Arthur Curry was rescued by a kindly lighthouse keeper. Unbeknownst to them, Arthur was he rightful king of Atlantis. Once he took the thrown, Arthur also took on the superhero persona of Aquaman. He would fall in love and marry Mera, his queen.
 Superpowers: Under water abilities including extreme strength and breathing under the sea. Also… well you know he talks to fish and other sea creatures.
New 52: No beard. No hook.
With all the rumors surrounding Man of Steel 2, I half expect to hear half the film will take place in Atlantis, with King Aquaman ordering the fight between Batman and Superman.

Know Your DCU: Aquaman

Oh Aquaman. Has there ever been a superhero as popular and more misunderstood? When done in animation, he’s always been treated with respect. It’s why I went with the above images. An incredible character, who has always had some of the best books arriving every month… whether you like him classic, hook handed, or bearded.

  • Comics History: Created by Paul Norris and Mort Weisinger, Aquaman first appeared in More Fun Comics #73 in November 1941. He would go on the found the justice league (pre-crisis, post crisis, Detroit, and New 52). Post Crisis, the character grew a beard and lost a hand… he got better.
  • Pop Culture History: Superfriends, Justice League, and Batman: The Brave and the Bold (which is a fan favorite).
  • Character History: As a baby Arthur Curry was rescued by a kindly lighthouse keeper. Unbeknownst to them, Arthur was he rightful king of Atlantis. Once he took the thrown, Arthur also took on the superhero persona of Aquaman. He would fall in love and marry Mera, his queen.
  • Superpowers: Under water abilities including extreme strength and breathing under the sea. Also… well you know he talks to fish and other sea creatures.
  • New 52: No beard. No hook.

With all the rumors surrounding Man of Steel 2, I half expect to hear half the film will take place in Atlantis, with King Aquaman ordering the fight between Batman and Superman.




Know Your DCU: Green Lantern (Hal Jordan)
My first introduction to Hal Jordan came in the page’s of Kevin Smith’s run on Green Arrow. It actually introduced the relationship between Ollie and Hal (a relationship I feel is missing from comics) and I learned about Hal’s history: a great Green Lantern who fell off the deep end and became Parallax only to serve time as the Spectre before returning to his former GL glory. While I loved Kyle Rayner, I wanted to Lantern mythos to return, and Geoff Johns handled that with aplomb.   
Comics History: With the success of reinventing the Flash for modern times, Hal Jordan was reinvented as the second DC Comics hero to call himself Green Lantern (more on that in a future article). Hal made his debut in Showcase #22 in October 1959. He was re-imagined by by writer John Broome and penciler Gil Kane. Hal Jordan has been one of the many Green Lanterns ever since (with the exception of the stuff discussed above). 
Pop Culture History: Ryan Reynolds…. and an awesome appearance on Duck Dodgers. And wasn’t there a cartoon on Cartoon Network that totally didn’t get enough attention?
Character History: Green Lantern-> Parallax-> Spectre-> Green Lantern (man that was easier to explain than I thought it would be).
 Superpowers: The power ring, the most dangerous weapon in the universe, and extraordinary willpower.
New 52: Supposedly Hal Jordan’s entire history is still intact, but that could change any day now the way the New 52 is going…

The Green Lantern mythos are some of the richest in comics. My hope is that WB will reintroduce audiences to these mythos soon, whether in another big screen outing, or maybe a live action TV series. 

Know Your DCU: Green Lantern (Hal Jordan)

My first introduction to Hal Jordan came in the page’s of Kevin Smith’s run on Green Arrow. It actually introduced the relationship between Ollie and Hal (a relationship I feel is missing from comics) and I learned about Hal’s history: a great Green Lantern who fell off the deep end and became Parallax only to serve time as the Spectre before returning to his former GL glory. While I loved Kyle Rayner, I wanted to Lantern mythos to return, and Geoff Johns handled that with aplomb.  

  • Comics History: With the success of reinventing the Flash for modern times, Hal Jordan was reinvented as the second DC Comics hero to call himself Green Lantern (more on that in a future article). Hal made his debut in Showcase #22 in October 1959. He was re-imagined by by writer John Broome and penciler Gil Kane. Hal Jordan has been one of the many Green Lanterns ever since (with the exception of the stuff discussed above).
  • Pop Culture History: Ryan Reynolds…. and an awesome appearance on Duck Dodgers. And wasn’t there a cartoon on Cartoon Network that totally didn’t get enough attention?
  • Character History: Green Lantern-> Parallax-> Spectre-> Green Lantern (man that was easier to explain than I thought it would be).
  • Superpowers: The power ring, the most dangerous weapon in the universe, and extraordinary willpower.
  • New 52: Supposedly Hal Jordan’s entire history is still intact, but that could change any day now the way the New 52 is going…
The Green Lantern mythos are some of the richest in comics. My hope is that WB will reintroduce audiences to these mythos soon, whether in another big screen outing, or maybe a live action TV series. 


Know Your DCU: The Flash (Barry Allen)
When I started reading comics The Flash, to me, was Wally West. Barry Allen, much like Jason Todd, was more important to me because of their death and how that effected the DCU, and less important as an actual character. However, since Barry’s return I’ve grown to embrace the character and his rich DCU history.  
Comics History: Barry Allen is the second DC Comics hero to call himself the Flash (more on that in a future article), but the first Flash in the DCU we know today. Barry Allen made his debut in Showcase #4 from October 1956. He was re-imagined by by writers Robert Kanigher & John Broome and penciler Carmine Infantino. Barry fought the good fight until his death in the first Crisis. He came back during the final Crisis, and transformed the entire DCU into the New 52 after Flashpoint.
Pop Culture History: The Flash had a mildly successful TV series on CBS in the 90’s. He was played by John Wesley Shipp.
Character History: Police officer Barry Allen was in a chemical lab when a lightning bolt came through the window, splashing chemicals all over him and granting Barry super-speed. He became The Flash! He also had a speedy sidekick named Wally West (the Kid Flash), who was the nephew of his wife Iris West. As mentioned, he died and came back a few times, so Wally filled in for him.
 Superpowers: Fast, Fast, FAST! His running speed comes from tapping into something called “the speed force”
New 52: He never died, and there is no Wally West that we know of…
I’m hoping the Flash’s scheduled Arrow appearance (and possibly spin-off series) will also tie in to the new “cinematic DCU”. But who knows?

Know Your DCU: The Flash (Barry Allen)

When I started reading comics The Flash, to me, was Wally West. Barry Allen, much like Jason Todd, was more important to me because of their death and how that effected the DCU, and less important as an actual character. However, since Barry’s return I’ve grown to embrace the character and his rich DCU history.  

  • Comics History: Barry Allen is the second DC Comics hero to call himself the Flash (more on that in a future article), but the first Flash in the DCU we know today. Barry Allen made his debut in Showcase #4 from October 1956. He was re-imagined by by writers Robert Kanigher & John Broome and penciler Carmine Infantino. Barry fought the good fight until his death in the first Crisis. He came back during the final Crisis, and transformed the entire DCU into the New 52 after Flashpoint.
  • Pop Culture History: The Flash had a mildly successful TV series on CBS in the 90’s. He was played by John Wesley Shipp.
  • Character History: Police officer Barry Allen was in a chemical lab when a lightning bolt came through the window, splashing chemicals all over him and granting Barry super-speed. He became The Flash! He also had a speedy sidekick named Wally West (the Kid Flash), who was the nephew of his wife Iris West. As mentioned, he died and came back a few times, so Wally filled in for him.
  • Superpowers: Fast, Fast, FAST! His running speed comes from tapping into something called “the speed force”
  • New 52: He never died, and there is no Wally West that we know of…

I’m hoping the Flash’s scheduled Arrow appearance (and possibly spin-off series) will also tie in to the new “cinematic DCU”. But who knows?


Know Your DCU: Green Arrow
Green Arrow is, without a doubt, one of my favorite comic characters in the DC pantheon. I am very happy to see him gaining mainstream popularity, but I am a little less than thrilled that the comics are trying to emulate the TV series. I could use a goatee, liberal minded, robin hood looking, Ollie running around.  
Comics History: Green Arrow made his debut in More Fun Comics #73 by Mort Weisinger and artist George Pepp in 1941. The character took off and found his voice in the words of Dennis O’Neil and his signature look in the hands of Neal Adams. The character met his demise “post-crisis” in the 90’s and was replaced in the comics by his illegitimate son. The character returned thanks to Kevin Smith in the year 2000, and has been a regular series ever since. 
Pop Culture History: Ollie managed to stay out of the public eye (with the exception of appearances in recent animated series and on Smallville), but has become very popular thanks to his show Arrow.
Character History: Oliver Queen, a millionaire out of Star City, was on a cruise when he fell over board and washed up on a small island. In order to survive he crafted bowes and arrows and trained himself in archery to catch food (and to also have some fun). Becoming an expert archer in the months (or years, it’s not really clear) he spent on the island, he finally manages to get back to Star City. He uses his money to become a modern day Robin Hood, calling himself Green Arrow.
 Superpowers: Skilled archer. Pretty good brawler.
New 52: He lives in Seattle….
Lately, I’ve been hoping Arrow will tie into the Man of Steel “cinematic DCU”. Looking forward to season 2 of Arrow and all that it has in store…

Know Your DCU: Green Arrow

Green Arrow is, without a doubt, one of my favorite comic characters in the DC pantheon. I am very happy to see him gaining mainstream popularity, but I am a little less than thrilled that the comics are trying to emulate the TV series. I could use a goatee, liberal minded, robin hood looking, Ollie running around.

  • Comics History: Green Arrow made his debut in More Fun Comics #73 by Mort Weisinger and artist George Pepp in 1941. The character took off and found his voice in the words of Dennis O’Neil and his signature look in the hands of Neal Adams. The character met his demise “post-crisis” in the 90’s and was replaced in the comics by his illegitimate son. The character returned thanks to Kevin Smith in the year 2000, and has been a regular series ever since.
  • Pop Culture History: Ollie managed to stay out of the public eye (with the exception of appearances in recent animated series and on Smallville), but has become very popular thanks to his show Arrow.
  • Character History: Oliver Queen, a millionaire out of Star City, was on a cruise when he fell over board and washed up on a small island. In order to survive he crafted bowes and arrows and trained himself in archery to catch food (and to also have some fun). Becoming an expert archer in the months (or years, it’s not really clear) he spent on the island, he finally manages to get back to Star City. He uses his money to become a modern day Robin Hood, calling himself Green Arrow.
  • Superpowers: Skilled archer. Pretty good brawler.
  • New 52: He lives in Seattle….

Lately, I’ve been hoping Arrow will tie into the Man of Steel “cinematic DCU”. Looking forward to season 2 of Arrow and all that it has in store…

Know Your DCU: Wonder Woman
I originally intended this article to have a bit of a different format when it returned two weeks ago and tried it in paragraph form, but was less than happy with the results. So Wonder Woman gets to kick off the new format, and I feel like a character this groundbreaking deserves nothing out. Wonder Woman is one of the most popular and recognizable superheroes in the world. She is a symbol for many, but still somehow evades the respect she so deserves by her corporate overlords.
Comics History: Wonder Woman was created by psychologist and writer William Moulton Marston and made her debut in All Star Comics #8 in 1941. She started her career beating on Nazi’s and hasn’t stopped fighting for the oppressed ever since.
Pop Culture History: From 1975-1979, Lynda Carter depicted the hero in the highly regarded Wonder Woman television series. Besides appearances in several animated shows, Wonder Woman has not had a live action appearance ever since. There are a lot of reasons as to why, but lately the excuse is “she doesn’t have a clear origin story”.  Read the next parts to see if you agree… It’s a frustrating error that I hope DC and WB change ASAP.
Character History: Princess Diana is from Themyscira, a hidden/magical Greek island filled with powerful Amazons. Her mother is Queen and told her she made her from clay and the gods brought her to life. She leaves the island as their champion to enter the “world of man” to fight for peace and save humanity from itself. How she learned of the outside world and the motivation for leaving the island has changed over the years, but her compassion and her fury have always been part of the character.
 Superpowers: Super strength, flight (on her own or with an invisible jet), bracelets that repel bullets, and a magical lasso that will make anyone tell the truth.
New 52: She dates Superman and her dad is Zeus…. none of which has happened before, not ever really needed to.
Now… WHERE IS OUR WONDER WOMAN MOVIE???

Know Your DCU: Wonder Woman

I originally intended this article to have a bit of a different format when it returned two weeks ago and tried it in paragraph form, but was less than happy with the results. So Wonder Woman gets to kick off the new format, and I feel like a character this groundbreaking deserves nothing out. Wonder Woman is one of the most popular and recognizable superheroes in the world. She is a symbol for many, but still somehow evades the respect she so deserves by her corporate overlords.

  • Comics History: Wonder Woman was created by psychologist and writer William Moulton Marston and made her debut in All Star Comics #8 in 1941. She started her career beating on Nazi’s and hasn’t stopped fighting for the oppressed ever since.
  • Pop Culture History: From 1975-1979, Lynda Carter depicted the hero in the highly regarded Wonder Woman television series. Besides appearances in several animated shows, Wonder Woman has not had a live action appearance ever since. There are a lot of reasons as to why, but lately the excuse is “she doesn’t have a clear origin story”.  Read the next parts to see if you agree… It’s a frustrating error that I hope DC and WB change ASAP.
  • Character History: Princess Diana is from Themyscira, a hidden/magical Greek island filled with powerful Amazons. Her mother is Queen and told her she made her from clay and the gods brought her to life. She leaves the island as their champion to enter the “world of man” to fight for peace and save humanity from itself. How she learned of the outside world and the motivation for leaving the island has changed over the years, but her compassion and her fury have always been part of the character.
  • Superpowers: Super strength, flight (on her own or with an invisible jet), bracelets that repel bullets, and a magical lasso that will make anyone tell the truth.
  • New 52: She dates Superman and her dad is Zeus…. none of which has happened before, not ever really needed to.

Now… WHERE IS OUR WONDER WOMAN MOVIE???

Know Your DCU: Batman
Batman debuted in Detective Comics in May 1939, based off a concept by Bob Kane which was fleshed out by Bill Finger (with later major contributions made by Dick Sprang, Jerry Robinson, Denny O’Neal, Frank Miller, and countless others). Batman became immensely popular and spawned multitude of comics, movie serials, the infamous Adam West TV show, the DCAU series, the Burton/Schumacher movies, the Nolan Dark Knight trilogy, the just announced Batman/Superman film, and so much more. Batman has become a major pop culture icon.
As a boy, Bruce Wayne witnesses his parents shot in front of him in Crime Alley. He inherits their immense fortune and uses it to train his mind and body to fight crime in Gotham. In order to hide his identity and strike fear in the criminals he faces, he becomes the Batman. Bruce allies himself with several sidekicks, Police Commissioner Jim Gordon, and his trusty butler Alfred. His presence in Gotham brings about the end of traditional organized crime, but opens the flood gates for a new breed of criminals (the Joker, Two Face, just to name a few).
What about the New 52? Well everything seems to be the same in the New 52, but Bruce’s first year in Gotham is currently being examined in Scott Snyder’s Zero Year.

Know Your DCU: Batman

Batman debuted in Detective Comics in May 1939, based off a concept by Bob Kane which was fleshed out by Bill Finger (with later major contributions made by Dick Sprang, Jerry Robinson, Denny O’Neal, Frank Miller, and countless others). Batman became immensely popular and spawned multitude of comics, movie serials, the infamous Adam West TV show, the DCAU series, the Burton/Schumacher movies, the Nolan Dark Knight trilogy, the just announced Batman/Superman film, and so much more. Batman has become a major pop culture icon.

As a boy, Bruce Wayne witnesses his parents shot in front of him in Crime Alley. He inherits their immense fortune and uses it to train his mind and body to fight crime in Gotham. In order to hide his identity and strike fear in the criminals he faces, he becomes the Batman. Bruce allies himself with several sidekicks, Police Commissioner Jim Gordon, and his trusty butler Alfred. His presence in Gotham brings about the end of traditional organized crime, but opens the flood gates for a new breed of criminals (the Joker, Two Face, just to name a few).

What about the New 52? Well everything seems to be the same in the New 52, but Bruce’s first year in Gotham is currently being examined in Scott Snyder’s Zero Year.

Know Your DCU returns again next week. 

Know Your DCU returns again next week. 

Know Your DCU: Superman
I am starting off the return of the Know Your DCU article with the Man of Steel himself, the original superhero, Superman. I put this article on hold two years ago, when the “New 52” started and I didn’t want to confuse new readers with outdated information. In bringing back the article, I’m going to start off with some of the more popular characters and give a broad history of their backgrounds in comics and in popular culture. 
Superman made his debut in Action Comics #1 in 1938 by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. The character took off, and what followed were more comics, a weekly radio play (ask your grandparents/great-grandparents), animated shorts, movie serials, multiple TV shows (both live action and animated), the Christopher Reeves movies, the recent Man of Steel movie, and the just announced Batman/Superman film.
In all these different forms of media, the story is always the same: the baby Kal-El is sent from the planet Krypton to Earth and is raised as Clark Kent by two kindly farmers in Kansas. Our planet gives Kal-El unlimited strength and the ability to fly, along with heat vision and freeze breath. Clark Kent, a mild mannered reporter for the Daily Planet, takes on the persona of Superman and fights for truth, justice, and the American way. And in one way or another, Lois Lane is always in his life.
What about the New 52? Clark is a “blogger, dates Wonder Woman, and his suit is alien technology that takes whatever form he chooses. So yea, things are a bit different…

Know Your DCU: Superman

I am starting off the return of the Know Your DCU article with the Man of Steel himself, the original superhero, Superman. I put this article on hold two years ago, when the “New 52” started and I didn’t want to confuse new readers with outdated information. In bringing back the article, I’m going to start off with some of the more popular characters and give a broad history of their backgrounds in comics and in popular culture.

Superman made his debut in Action Comics #1 in 1938 by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. The character took off, and what followed were more comics, a weekly radio play (ask your grandparents/great-grandparents), animated shorts, movie serials, multiple TV shows (both live action and animated), the Christopher Reeves movies, the recent Man of Steel movie, and the just announced Batman/Superman film.

In all these different forms of media, the story is always the same: the baby Kal-El is sent from the planet Krypton to Earth and is raised as Clark Kent by two kindly farmers in Kansas. Our planet gives Kal-El unlimited strength and the ability to fly, along with heat vision and freeze breath. Clark Kent, a mild mannered reporter for the Daily Planet, takes on the persona of Superman and fights for truth, justice, and the American way. And in one way or another, Lois Lane is always in his life.

What about the New 52? Clark is a “blogger, dates Wonder Woman, and his suit is alien technology that takes whatever form he chooses. So yea, things are a bit different…

Next week, the Know Your DCU weekly article series returns in a big way.

Next week, the Know Your DCU weekly article series returns in a big way.

Know Your DCU: Bane
I remember reading the Knightfall story arc in the pages of DC Comics like it was yesterday and know full well just how worthy a villain Bane can be when pitted against Batman. However, there are many of you out there who may know very little about Bane and to those people I say read this article with caution. I’m going to go a bit into detail about Bane's origins and the story he is famous for. These elements may or may not be in this summer’s The Dark Knight Rises and I would hate for anything I write to spoil the film for you. So, like I said, read at your own risk.



Bane was born in the Caribbean Republic of Santa Prisca, in a prison called Peña Dura. His father had been a revolutionary who escaped Santa Prisca, but the corrupt government decreed that his son would serve  out the man’s life sentence. After years in the prison, Bane is forced to  become a test subject for a mysterious drug known as Venom. The experiment nearly kills Bane, but he survives and finds the drug increasing his physical strength. Soon after these experiments, Bane turns his thoughts to destroying Batman (because this is what drives most Batman villains).  
Bane studies Batman and knows a direct attack on him would not work. So after escaping prison and heading to Gotham City, Bane destroys Arkham Asylum with a rocket launcher and sets its inmates  on Gotham City. Batman spends the next few months rounding up the criminals. This tires out Batman and upon returning to Wayne Manor one night, Bane ambushes him. Bane kinda just figured out on his own that Batman was Bruce Wayne. Seriously. Anyways, Bane attacks Batman, defeats him, and breaks Batman's back, leaving him paralyzed from the waist down . Bane thus becomes the man who has “Broken the Bat”.  
We all know Bruce Wayne gets better, so that’s not really important information here. After all of this Bane goes back and forth between being a villain and a hero. He has yet to show up in the New 52, but when he does I suspect he’ll be a villain again. Well, I hope you liked the return of the Know Your DCU article and that this was a good prep for the Bane character!

Know Your DCU: Bane

I remember reading the Knightfall story arc in the pages of DC Comics like it was yesterday and know full well just how worthy a villain Bane can be when pitted against Batman. However, there are many of you out there who may know very little about Bane and to those people I say read this article with caution. I’m going to go a bit into detail about Bane's origins and the story he is famous for. These elements may or may not be in this summer’s The Dark Knight Rises and I would hate for anything I write to spoil the film for you. So, like I said, read at your own risk.

Bane was born in the Caribbean Republic of Santa Prisca, in a prison called Peña Dura. His father had been a revolutionary who escaped Santa Prisca, but the corrupt government decreed that his son would serve out the man’s life sentence. After years in the prison, Bane is forced to become a test subject for a mysterious drug known as Venom. The experiment nearly kills Bane, but he survives and finds the drug increasing his physical strength. Soon after these experiments, Bane turns his thoughts to destroying Batman (because this is what drives most Batman villains).  

Bane studies Batman and knows a direct attack on him would not work. So after escaping prison and heading to Gotham City, Bane destroys Arkham Asylum with a rocket launcher and sets its inmates on Gotham City. Batman spends the next few months rounding up the criminals. This tires out Batman and upon returning to Wayne Manor one night, Bane ambushes him. Bane kinda just figured out on his own that Batman was Bruce Wayne. Seriously. Anyways, Bane attacks Batman, defeats him, and breaks Batman's back, leaving him paralyzed from the waist down . Bane thus becomes the man who has “Broken the Bat”.  

We all know Bruce Wayne gets better, so that’s not really important information here. After all of this Bane goes back and forth between being a villain and a hero. He has yet to show up in the New 52, but when he does I suspect he’ll be a villain again. Well, I hope you liked the return of the Know Your DCU article and that this was a good prep for the Bane character!

Tomorrow, a special Christmas/Hanukkah present to you all with the return of Know Your DCU. Guess which character will be the star?

Tomorrow, a special Christmas/Hanukkah present to you all with the return of Know Your DCU. Guess which character will be the star?

Know Your DCU

Hey gang,

I’m going to take a month long break from the Know Your DCU article to let the dust settle in the new DCU. Until then, enjoy the past entries in this series.

Know Your DCU: Barry Allen (The Flash)
Barry Allen is a man running out of time. Literally.
This Wednesday August 31st 2011, the second man to call himself The Flash in the DCU will be fighting for the future of that very time-line he called home. From what we know, with a Universe wide reboot, Barry may not entirely succeed. He’s been down this road before.
Years ago during the first Crisis, Barry sacrificed himself to save the DC multiverse. The result was the destruction of the multiverse leading to a new version of the DCU with a new timeline. We know this will happen again, but the multiverse will survive. Both the multiverse and Barry would return, with Barry doing so to save the DC multiverse again from the Final Crisis. He succeeded. That very multiverse was what made Barry famous, as he traveled across it to meet the first hero to call himself The Flash. Their interdimensional adventures sent shock waves through out time and space and may have sealed Barry's fate.
If you come this site daily, you know how Barry got his powers: lightning, chemicals, and destiny. Wednesday, we can only hope that same destiny brings Barry Allen safely back to a new DCU. But will it be a better one?

Know Your DCU: Barry Allen (The Flash)

Barry Allen is a man running out of time. Literally.

This Wednesday August 31st 2011, the second man to call himself The Flash in the DCU will be fighting for the future of that very time-line he called home. From what we know, with a Universe wide reboot, Barry may not entirely succeed. He’s been down this road before.

Years ago during the first Crisis, Barry sacrificed himself to save the DC multiverse. The result was the destruction of the multiverse leading to a new version of the DCU with a new timeline. We know this will happen again, but the multiverse will survive. Both the multiverse and Barry would return, with Barry doing so to save the DC multiverse again from the Final Crisis. He succeeded. That very multiverse was what made Barry famous, as he traveled across it to meet the first hero to call himself The Flash. Their interdimensional adventures sent shock waves through out time and space and may have sealed Barry's fate.

If you come this site daily, you know how Barry got his powers: lightning, chemicals, and destiny. Wednesday, we can only hope that same destiny brings Barry Allen safely back to a new DCU. But will it be a better one?